riley

Trim Work Begins

Classic car technician Brian has begun the trim work on our 1929 Riley 9 Tourer. The first step of this was to remove the front

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Riley Problem Solving

Currently, we’re doing a lot of research into our 1951 Riley as the restoration of it will need a lot of multi-trade skills from woodwork

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Riley Burning

Pricey has been burning off leftover under-sealer and old paint before it goes to sandblasting. He then scrapes it off so that as little is

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1951 Riley Disassembly

We’ve started on the restoration on our Riley which is in for body refurbishment and paint. Currently the fabrication bay have taken the body from

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Riley Completed

Our 1953 Riley RMS has been completed, having had its overdrive removed and it now awaiting collection from the client.

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Riley Ressurection

Our lovely 1953 Riley which broke down recently is currently being stored up at Bentwaters whilst we wait for the parts to come back. This

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Restoring the Riley

Our 1953 Riley RMS initially came in with some alignment issues with the bonnet and side panels however we discovered that the handbrake was sticking.

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The Return Of The Riley

This 1953 Riley RMS has come in to the workshop for some alignment issues. We’ve had this beautiful Pistachio and Cream dual-toned Riley in before,

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Workshop Welcome!

This week we’ve giving a warm welcome to some fantastic classics. Arriving in the workshop we’ve had a real mix, from a 1967 Jaguar MKII

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Rapid Riley Turnaround

The owner of this fabulous 1953 Riley came to Bridge Classic Cars fearing the worst. The thermostat was showing severe overheating, often connected to a

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1905 Riley 9hp

Recently acquired by us here at Bridge Classic Cars with the intention of carrying out a full and well deserved restoration. Our car features in

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Battery Box Framework

The battery box metal frame is almost complete and will eventually have an ash wood box for battery to sit in.

Trim Work Begins

Classic car technician Brian has begun the trim work on our 1929 Riley 9 Tourer. The first step of this was to remove the front seats and base boards from the car. Brian then removed the rear axle cover so that it could be used as a pattern to make the rear seat base board.

These were cut out before Brian went on to remove the rear floor board to trim the sides in order to allow for the side panels to fit. The rear seat board was then fitted into the car and the backboard was cut out.

Brian made the pattern for the rear seat top edge and then cut this out. The rear seat board was trial fitted and the back edge was cut in line with the curve of the car body.

Rear quarter panels were the next focus of Brian. He made paper patterns and used these to mark out the panels on plywood. These were cut out and then fit into the car. The axle cover board was re-fitted before the rear base seat board was re-fitted too.

Brian went on to cut slots out for the rear squab board brackets and then fit the brackets in the car. He fit the squab board into the car before moving on to the door of our classic Riley. Once the door handle was removed, Brian made a paper pattern for the door panel and marked this out on wood. The door panel was cut out and a hole was made for the lock handle.

Brian fit the door panel to the car door and cut out the slot at the back for the lock. Paper patterns were made for the passenger side door panels.

Helping Hand – Drawings for the 1905 Riley 9hp

Bridge Classic Cars have the absolute honour of restoring one of 3 1905 Riley 9hp’s left. And for that, we’ve managed to get some plans.

These appear to be copies of the original drawings made for the car. These are crucial for our lead restoration technician Dave to work from. They give our team chassis measurements and tolerances of several key pieces of the car. As with all our restorations, we do try and keep the originality of the car but we ensure the car is safe first and foremost.

With these original schematics, Dave can begin to measure the chassis and components to make sure they are safe but also meet the original specifications.

It is truly an honour to work on such a rare and unique car as our 1905 Riley 9hp.

One Door Closes – Update on the Doors of the 1951 Riley RMB

The doors for the 1951 Riley RMB are currently at local joinery specialists Ashbocking Joinery to have the wooden sections of the doors assessed and replaced.

As you can see from the photos, the doors aren’t in the best condition, but Darren and the team at Ashbocking Joinery are working their way through each of them methodically to perfectly recreate the frames.

Darren and the team at Ashbocking Joinery are using what is left of the original wood as templates and then meticulously interpreting any missing pieces into the design.

This is all happening alongside the metalwork which is being down by our own in-house master fabricator, Clinton.

Starting Up – Beginning Work on the 1905 Riley 9HP

Bridge Classic Cars has the honour of beginning the restoration on this incredible 1905 Riley 9HP, believed to be one of just three remaining in the world. Our in-house restoration teams have this once in a lifetime opportunity to work on this amazing project.

The rebuild and assessment of the project will be headed up by our most experienced technician, Dave. Daves wealth of knowledge and experience across all eras of classic and vintage cars makes him our strongest team member to assess the car. Using reference photos from our visit to the National Motor Museum, which houses the only complete car publicly accessible, Dave and Gordon could begin to go through the parts and components we have amassed for this very special project.

It’s a very exciting prospect of working on such a rare and unique piece of automotive history for us all here at Bridge Classic Cars. So, expect to see some more updates on the 1905 Riley 9HP soon here on the Bridge Classic Cars newspage.

Progression – Working on the Wings of the 1951 Riley RMB

The Bridge Classic Cars in-house fabrication shop is working on the wings for the 1951 Riley RMB that we have in for restoration by our amazing teams.

The car is currently with our incredible fabricator Clinton, who has been working on repairing the wings for the classic Riley. He has carefully removed rusty or corroded sections of the wing of the Riley in order to repair them and thanks to his skill and talent, completely disappear into the existing metal.

The new pieces have been entirely hand-formed by Clinton in cour in-house fabrication shop for the Riley RMB using traditional techniques and practices. As you can see, the results are absolutely fantastic.

This Just In – 1934 Riley 9 Lynx

Bridge Classic Cars have today welcomed its latest guest to the Pettistree workshop. This 1934 Riley 12/4 Lynx has come to us all the way from South Africa where it has spent parts of its long life.

The car will be going in to be assessed by our in-house restoration teams to determine what jobs will need to be done to this classic tourer to get it into a useable and safe condition. The Riley is finished in an incredible French blue with a black interior. The 4 door tourer is a wonderful example of pre-war open-top travel in both style and comfort by a long-gone marque.

The car was cherished and used in South Africa being part of the local enthusiast groups and taking part in several classic car rallies. For now, the Bridge Classic Cars technicians will begin to reassemble the car to be able to check and confirm all parts and pieces for the 1930s tourer are there and in good order.

Expect to see more on this amazing 1934 Riley 12/4 Lynx on the Bridge Classic Cars news page.

Gentle and Fair – Reworking the Rear Wing of the 1951 Riley RMB

With a car as intricate and flowing as the 1951 Riley RMB, it’s important that our in-house metalwork craftsmen at Bridge Classic Cars apply all their skills and knowledge to ensure each flow, curve and line are exactly right on the car.

Highlighted in this post is the extensive work our fabricator James has done on the rear wing of the Riley RMB. Much of the original material had pitted in places, and in some places to the point of allowing holes to grow in the metal itself especially along the rear flange. This piece has been replaced before as can be seen by the various patches and pieces along the length of the panel.

Carefully and with much reserve, James began to remove the affected piece from the panel. Removing only what needed to be and keep as much of the original piece as possible. The new section would have to be entirely handmade for this wing but that is no problem for our fabrication shop.

James measured not only the length but the thickness of the piece that would be needed to replace the original flange. Then, using the English wheel, James skillfully began to give the piece its shape and form. Constantly offering up the new piece and referring to the shape of the original. A combination of shrinking and stretching key areas of the panel allowed it to blend into the original piece.

Then, it came time to join the two parts together. Slowly and precisely James TIG welded the parts together at strategic points, allowing the piece to cool at the correct rate and distributing the heat in such a way as to minimise the warp caused to the panel from the process. Once completely married up, James then began to finesse the join.

Using a planishing hammer and a selection of dollies, James began to smooth the joint between the two panels together until there little to no signs they had never been together their entire lives. That is craftsmanship…

Grinding away that surface corrosion

Lydia has been helping with the progress of the 1951 Riley RMB. There was surface corrosion on the inside of one of the original wings round the edges of the spot welds done by James. Lydia did this with various-sized grinding attachments on a drill. A small step in the process, but a vital one, nonetheless, since we don’t want that surface corrosion getting worse or showing through the paint when it goes into that stage.

The repair process of a Riley chassis…

After coming back from the sandblasters, the chassis of the 1951 yellow Riley RMB is looking a little corroded so James is going to have to repair these sections. Lydia has begun the process by making cardboard templates of these parts, cutting where necessary to get the shaping right. These templates will be used by James to mark out around on the new metal. The original corroded metal will be removed and the new will be welded into place.

Repair work on the Riley.

James has been continuing his work on the yellow 1951 Riley. The air vent for the second panel was sandblasted last week, so could be welded into its new surrounding. James then used the finished one to determine how much metal to trim off the end. Back in July, he had to do some welding repair work on the left-hand wing. He’s now repaired the other wing. The subframe came back from the sandblasters and showed how much corrosion there was. James has started to make cardboard templates for the parts that need replacing, to mark out new pieces of metal for fabrication.

Small update on the Riley.

Here’s an update on the 1951 Riley RMB for you. It was found that there was hidden corrosion in between the layers of metal on one of the air vents. In order to get to this, James drilled through the spot welds and eased the metal apart. Lydia then went about sandblasting the main piece of the air vent to remove the corrosion and paint. She also removed existing layers of paint off the side and back of the body shell of the Riley.

Riley Back From The Sandblasters

We’ve just received the chassis to our yellow 1951 Riley back from the sandblasters. With all the rust off, we can now start to build it back up.

Monaco’s New Shoes

Scott has been fitting the newly relined brake shoes to our Riley Monaco. This has cured the squealing brakes and has now gone back to its owner.

Riley Problem Solving

Currently, we’re doing a lot of research into our 1951 Riley as the restoration of it will need a lot of multi-trade skills from woodwork to metalwork. Lydia has been cleaning off the glue and paint from the panels.

Once we’ve got the detail blueprints back, we can start to measure up the new parts and make them.

Riley Monaco Adjustments

Scott has been working on our Riley Monaco to remove the brake shoes so that they can be sent off for relining with a softer material. He’s also fitted a lager rubber block to the clutch pedal to make it more easily accessible for the driver.

Riley Burning

Pricey has been burning off leftover under-sealer and old paint before it goes to sandblasting. He then scrapes it off so that as little is left as possible.

Breaking Down The Problem

Scott has begun to take apart the brakes on our 1934 Riley Monaco to determine the issue. He’s stripped the brakes down and checked them over, cleaned and greased them. He discovered that they still squeaked, so he filed the leading edge of the shoes to a chamfered edge. Unfortunately, Scott found that the squeaking still persisted so he decided the squeaking must be due to when the shoes were relined, the material used was too hard. The brakes are set to be sent away to be relined again.

Scott has also made up a block to go on the clutch pedal to make it easier for the owner to use the clutch.

Riley Monaco In For Squeaky Brakes

This 1934 Riley Monaco has come in to address the squeaking brakes, which are making rather severe noises. We’ll start taking them apart to see what the issue is.

1951 Riley Disassembly

We’ve started on the restoration on our Riley which is in for body refurbishment and paint. Currently the fabrication bay have taken the body from the chassis and started to strip the wooden frame. Once everything has been stripped and refurbished, we will then endeavour to repaint the body.

Riley Completed

Our 1953 Riley RMS has been completed, having had its overdrive removed and it now awaiting collection from the client.

Riley Ressurection

Our lovely 1953 Riley which broke down recently is currently being stored up at Bentwaters whilst we wait for the parts to come back. This poor classic unfortunately broke down due to loosing drive. We’ve taken the overdrive out and found that the coupling between the gearbox and overdrive was sheered. After repairing the coupling, we took it out on a test drive and found it still wasn’t running right, so on the customers request, we’re now endeavouring the remove the overdrive all together and modify the prop shaft back to its original size to run a standard gear box.

The prop shaft has been sent off to be shortened so whilst we wait, our Riley is relaxing in our hanger.

Riley Break Down And Diagnosis

This beloved Riley RMS has come in after being recovered from a break down. We understand that driving a classic can be a labour of love and at some point, you’re going to break down, but that’s what we’re here for! This Riley will be back on the road in no time.