trim shop

Having a tidy.

Tamas and Lydia have been tidying up the 1973 MG B GT V8 in various ways. It’s not in for a full restoration so a

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Jensen Tool Tray!

This tool tray is from the Peony Red 1960 Jensen 541S. It hasn’t got any tools that were in it, so the customer is going

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Hood work begins.

Kath has been starting the work on the 1989 TVR S2 rear window replacement on the soft top. Yesterday she removed the hood from the

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Tatty back window.

The clear PVC back window is starting to de-laminate and coming away at places, so we’ve ordered a new piece as a replacement. Kath has

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TR5 Trim Continued

Kath and Brian have continued their work with the 1968 Triumph TR5 and are now tackling the rear quarter. Kath has added foam over the

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Suited And Booted

Our 1960 Black Jensen 541R has had its new boot door trim fitted by our talented trim shop team! As ever, the process to get

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Workshop Walkaround

Grey Jensen gets furnished Our trim team has been fitting the rear centre section in place, cutting out sound deadening and glueing it to bodywork

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Tr6 fully covered

Our trim shop expert, Kath, has been busy making multiple covers for the magenta Triumph TR6. The hood and tonneau now have covers that have

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Another piece of the puzzle

Brian has been re-covering another piece from the 1963 Bentley S3 Continental. This time, the glovebox.

He started the process by removing the original covers from the metal box that makes the glovebox. He then used these original pieces as patterns on the new fabric, headlining fabric for most with one piece of leather. The headlining fabric pieces were glued onto the inside of the glovebox first, with the back piece having board underneath the material to give it structure and stability. Once this was all glued into place, Brian put the leather piece onto board as well, before glueing it onto the metal. All the material was wrapped around the edges to give a neat finish. Another piece of the Bentley interior finished!

Porsche 911SC gets back into shape

The work on the 1982 Porsche 911SC is now complete.

The Porsche has been in the trim shop after coming into us at the end of last week, getting its original upholstery freshened up and put back in. When it came to us, the carpets weren’t in, the door cards weren’t attached correctly, the pockets for the doors weren’t attached at all, there were a few bits of carpet panel that were loose and the stitching on the steering wheel had come undone. Kath has been busy resurrecting all of these issues over the last couple of days. As you can see, as well as creating interiors from scratch, the trim shop team are also perfectly capable of putting original ones back into good shape if customers prefer to not have a complete overhaul. If this is something you would be interested in for your classic car, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Bentley’s black trim continues

Brian has been re-covering more panels for the 1963 Bentley S3 Continental. This time it’s been dash panels, the instrument cover, door cappings and various other panels. The process for all of them involved taking the original black leather off, followed by any foam that was on the panels, and then sanding off the old glue left behind on the wood and metal forms. Brian used the original leather pieces as patterns to mark out around on the new black leather. He replaced the original foam with new 3mm foam. The foam was glued on first and then the leather wrapped over it. Some of the panels, as you can see, just have leather covering them.

1982 Porsche 911 incoming!

This 1982 Porsche 911 has recently arrived. The list of jobs that need addressing is the following: the door-bins need fitting, the leather restraint straps on the rear seat need fixing, the upholstery needs reviving with some form of treatment, the passenger window needs fixing because it’s stuck, the steering wheel needs re-stitching, the under-dash panels need to be stuck back down and/or repaired, a battery cut-off switch needs to be put in and the battery is flat so needs to be put on charge.

The first stop will be the trim shop.

Finished TVR Hood and a General Tidy-Up.

Kath has now finished repairing the hood on the 1989 TVR SII 2.9 V6. In the last blog post, we heard about how she was removing the old PVC window out of the hood, because of it becoming delaminated and coming out of the seam at the corners. She used the original as a pattern to mark out around and cut out on a sheet of new clear PVC. Once cut out, Kath applied contact adhesive to the outside edge of the PVC and slotted it in between the layers of hood fabric at the seam edge and left it to dry. She could then sew down the same lines where the previous stitching was to fully secure the window into place. New leather strips were sewn onto the corners. The hood could then be glued to its frame. The vertical bars on the hood frame that is attached to the car had flaking black paint on them. So these were sanded down and then re-painted. The pieces that hold the hood in place at the front and where the front roof panels slot into it, had flaking paint on them too, so these got re-painted in the same manner. The hood could then be attached to the car again. Kath also reglued various pieces of fabric that were coming away around the inside of the TVR.

Having a tidy.

Tamas and Lydia have been tidying up the 1973 MG B GT V8 in various ways. It’s not in for a full restoration so a sympathetic touch was required. There was fraying carpet in places and where it had come unstuck and screws had come out that were holding panels in place. Another thing was there were various painted pieces from the engine bay that had become corroded underneath the paint, so these were either sandblasted or ground down to remove the paint and corrosion, before re-painting.

Jensen Tool Tray!

This tool tray is from the Peony Red 1960 Jensen 541S. It hasn’t got any tools that were in it, so the customer is going to source those separately. Kath is going to shape a new piece of foam and cover it in black vinyl to match the dash. This piece of foam is the handle part, and the piece you see while sitting in the car. The tool tray sits underneath the dash, on the passenger side, and slots in like a draw into a metal frame.

Hood work begins.

Kath has been starting the work on the 1989 TVR S2 rear window replacement on the soft top. Yesterday she removed the hood from the roof frame. This involved taking out the metal plates that are on the front, and slot it into place when it’s up. The rubber seal was removed next, in order to start taking the fabric of the hood off the foam on the middle bar of the frame. Kath scraped the old glue off the foam. The removed hood was placed on a table and another bar was removed from it, before unpicking the old PVC window from the surrounding fabric. The old foam and glue that was left on the fabric was then scraped off. Tomorrow, Kath will be cutting out the new window from clear PVC and stitching into place, making sure to go through the same original stitch holes.

Tatty back window.

The clear PVC back window is starting to de-laminate and coming away at places, so we’ve ordered a new piece as a replacement. Kath has been removing the old one this morning in preparation.

Headlining finished for the 1990 BMW.

Brian has finished creating the new headlining for the 1990 BMW 750 iL. After taking the original fabric off the board and cleaning the board up, a grey nyylon brushed headlining foam was used to re-cover the board, which was similar to the original. Brian gradually glued the new fabric on, pressing into the curves and contours to get a neat finish, and trimmed away where any holes were for attachments and panels. After he had re-covered the board, Brian then set about rejuvenating the sun visor switch panel. Once that was done, the headlining board was put back into place in the car, along with the sun visor switch panel and all the panels and pieces that were taken out of the car to get the board out. Another job finished!

Carpet re-fresh continues for the DB 2/4.

Kath has been continuing her work on the 1955 Aston Martin DB 2/4’s carpet. This time, she’s re-made the left-hand footwell carpet, right-hand boot side panel, right-hand rear floor, right-hand rear under-seat, right-hand rear corner, right-hand rear sill, rear quarter panel (which needs the wood in still) and rear scuttle panel.

Headlining work begins on the BMW.

Brian has been getting on with renewing the headlining in the 1990 BMW 750iL. He started off by removing all the panels and parts that went onto the headlining and were holding it in place. Once these were all taken off, the board with the headlining on could come out via the boot of the car. Brian could then start taking the original headlining fabric off the board.

Front squab fitting for the Lilac Jensen!

In the trim shop, Brian has been fitting the front squab seats of the 1960 Jensen 541R to their foams and frames. These seats were created and sewn by Lydia a little while back. You can read about the process here and here.

Brian started the fitting process by glueing and stapling the front squab “faces”/fronts to the frames, making sure the leather was nice and tight with no wrinkles. The staples went around the back of the wooden frame. The back of each seat was then attached with staples that went into the piping flange. 3mm plywood was cut out to the correct shape using a paper template for the bottom of each seat, this was wrapped in the white leather/glued onto the wood. This plywood was nailed onto the bottom of the seats with tacks and does the job of hiding the staples and raw edges of the leather.

Starting on the Aston Martin carpets!

Kath has been starting on the carpet for the 1955 Aston Martin DB 2/4 this week.

The list of carpet pieces she’s made includes the front tunnel carpet, the rear under-seat carpets, the carpet that goes underneath the front of the gearbox, the top gearbox carpet, the gearbox tunnel carpets, the right-hand and left-hand foot well carpets, the carpet that goes around the throttle peddle, the rear foot well carpet and the rear boot-side panel carpet.

Each piece of carpet has got binding around some or all of the edges. This is made from the dark grey leather that was chosen, and is sewn on, right-side to right-side of the leather and carpet. It’s first stitched along the edge, and then the leather gets folded over to the under-side of the carpet and gets sewn again. The new carpet is grey to match the leather binding, whereas it was green and white carpet originally, with green binding.