tr5

TR5 Fine Tuning

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 is on the home straight with just a handful of fine tuning tweaks that need to be carried out. We’ve noticed

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TR5 TLC

We had Auto Electrics come over to wire up all of the electrics on our 1968 Triumph TR5. Our TR5 has had its bonnet repainted.

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TR5 Trim Fits

Kath and Brian have both been working on our 1968 Triumph TR5 recently. Kath has fitted the door cards which could be placed in now

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TR5 Trim Continued

Kath and Brian have continued their work with the 1968 Triumph TR5 and are now tackling the rear quarter. Kath has added foam over the

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TR5 Carpet update

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 is still sat in the trim shop having its new interior fitted! Its a very exciting development as fitting trim to

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TR5 Next Steps

Our Triumph TR5 has had a bespoke bumper iron made in the workshop to fit underneath behind the front wheel. One of our technicians made

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TR5 Update

The reverse lights have been fitted to the TR5 along with the fuel gauge sender unit fuel return pipes and fuel hose filler. Rubber and

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Advancements on the TR5

Mauro’s recent adjustments to our 1968 Triumph Tr5 include added fittings to the dashboard and many small mechanisms added throughout the vehicle. It’s the small

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Workshop Walkabout

Our week has been very busy with two photoshoots at the start of the week and new projects arriving in the workshop. Tr6’s new hood

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TR5 Fine Tuning

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 is on the home straight with just a handful of fine tuning tweaks that need to be carried out. We’ve noticed a few small running issues and exhaust troubles that we will address next.

TR5 Up And Running For The First Time

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 has been a total nut and bolt restoration, with it looking like just a chassis and some mechanics only 6 months ago. Today it was started for the first time and it ran as expected with no series issues. The expected teething issues of a brand new engine have occurred, including a large amount of smoke as the new components are run for the first time. The next step is to road test it to see how it runs.

Heat Wrapping The TR5 Exhaust

Mauro has been heat-wrapping the Triumph TR5 exhaust using a Header Wrap. This is done to improve the exhaust flow and to reduce the risk of the Scavenging Effect. Scavenging occurs when the rush of the exhaust gas leaves the cylinder pulls in more fresh air and fuel.

It also lowers the temperature in the engine to reduce the risk of overheating. Wrapped headers will increase the torque and horse power by a small amount as well.

TR5 TLC

We had Auto Electrics come over to wire up all of the electrics on our 1968 Triumph TR5.

Our TR5 has had its bonnet repainted. The original paint job for this vehicle was done externally as per the clients request however we are now starting to see micro blistering within the paint and are endeavouring the rectify the problems.

Chris has stripped the bonnet to bare metal, applied rust treatment, added epoxy primer, body fill to smooth the imperfections and then applied polyfan filler primer which was rubbed down and covered in a high build primer. The final step was to then rub it down and re-paint it.

Triumph TR5 Fuel And Brake Lines

Our classic Triumph TR5 is progressing well through its nut and bolt restoration. Mauro has recently fitted the fuel and brake lines as well as fitting the panel in the wheel arch known as the ‘baffle’ plate.

Mauro has also been working on correcting and fitting the bumper as he wasn’t happy with how it was sat.

Triumph TR5 Gets A New Hood

Kath has been working on the TR5 hood recently in the trim shop with the rest of the team. She bagan the process of making the hood by laying the cover over the hood frame and lined up the roof bars with the hood seams. She then took the cover off, attached the webbing to the bars to keep the frame in the right position using the rivets and metal plates. She then made up some vinyl for the edges to go along the side of the frame with Velcro sewn on. This is done so the hood can fasten to the frame.

Kath then glued up the frame and vinyl, attached the Velcro strips and bolted on the metal channels on each side for the rubber seal around the top of the window. The next step was to insert the rubber seal, trim the excess off once in the channel and fit a rubber seal along the windows. The rear window rail was then pushed in between the hood cloth so it sits comfortably in the middle.

Kath then centred up and glued the cover in underneath the rail. To neaten it up, Kath trimmed off the excess material and bolt down the rear rail onto the car. She then attached stud sockets to the top of the cover at the back and riveted them in place. She could then pull the cover tight at the front of the car, marked the position on the front of the car with some chalk and glued along the header rail and under the front cover. Kath attached the metal channel along the front with the rivets so that they ready to have the rubber inserted in. The rubber is often hard to fit into the riverts so Kath applies some ‘easy slide’ to help it fit in.

The next step in the process was to attach 3 stud buttons on each rear side to secure hood down. These were riverted on each side of car. Next Kath wrapped the rear rail around & secured it with rivets.

The rear hood cover has also been made by positioning the template cover over the hood and Kath marked the centre. She attached a fastener, pulled the cover tight and marked a few positions of fasteners. She punched the hole out and then attached the buttons. She did this around the outside edge and once the outside was complete, she attached a couple of fasteners inside.

The final step was to make the tonneau cover. Kath added some fasteners along the top edge of the door, riveted them in place on both sides and centred up the cover before adding any fasteners. Kath marked the position of the first few stud buttons, attached the fasteners, clipped them down and finished by gradually go around the edge pulling the cover tight.

TR5 Trim Fits

Kath and Brian have both been working on our 1968 Triumph TR5 recently. Kath has fitted the door cards which could be placed in now that the door capping’s have been fit. Kath began by pushing in the panel clips into the back of the panel and aligning the clip with the hole in the door to push it into place. At first Kath noted that it wasn’t sitting straight forward so she had to adjust the panel by cutting off the piping from the top.

Once Kath had the clips in at the top, she could then go round the rest of the panel clips, cut out the holes for the window winder and door handle, fit the handles and move on to the other side to do the same thing again.

Kath also bolted the seat runners onto the floor and bolted in the centre console. This included fixing two bolts into the floor pan each side of tunnel section and one each side at the top.

The hood has also been fitted to check that the measurements align well. Kath laid the hood over the car ready to fit it later whilst she was waiting for the rubbers and header rail parts to arrive. By placing it over the frame, Kath could see if anything needed to be modified.

Brian has been fitting the chrome handle and lift up bar mechanism to the seats that allow the seat to move forward or back on the runners or from its hinges.

TR5 Trim Continued

Kath and Brian have continued their work with the 1968 Triumph TR5 and are now tackling the rear quarter.

Kath has added foam over the raised section in the boot and positioned the carpet over the foam to get an idea of how it would fit. Once happy, Kath could then glue the foam sections down and pack it out around the fuel tank. Once the foam is stuck down, Kath could then lay in and glue down the carpet in sections, pulling the carpet over the edge and down into footwell so that it fits tight. Once in place, Kath could trim around the corners, and get started on the hand brake gaiter section.

The hand brake gaiter section needed to have foam packed around the hand brake with an 11mm scrim foam piece so that the get carpet fits nicely. Once in position, the carpet can be glued down, making sure the fabric is pulled taught to ensure a fitted finish.

The next step was to fit the rear quarter panels and the door panel which clips onto a board. Kath found that she needed to adjust the panel around the wheel arch and the bottom section for seat belt eyelet first before fitting the sections. Once she had fitted the drivers side rear, Kath could then fit the passenger side and attach the carpet fasteers to footwells so that the mats don’t move about.

Finally, Kath could secure the carpet down in the upper foot well around the pedals and focus on the rear cockpit panel which needed to be screwed into place. Kath cut holes out for the hood mechanism and fit the hood mechanism in place so that it’s ready for the hood.

Brian started on the seats and their frames. He began by fitting the rubber diaphragm to the base seat and added foam around the front edge. He then glued the base cover to the upper foam and secured the lower foam in place underneath. The next step was to glue the base foam and cover to the seat frame and add extra foam around the front edge. By pulling the cover tight around the frame and clipping it in place, Brian could then glue the rear flap to the frame.

TR5 Carpet update

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 is still sat in the trim shop having its new interior fitted! Its a very exciting development as fitting trim to a vehicle is one of the final sections that really makes all the difference visually!

Kath has trimmed around and glued into position the carpet on the driver’s side under the pedals. She’s also fitted the driver’s side sill and the carpet near the accelerator pedal.

The centre console was then just laid in place to make sure it fits with the sound deadening now in place. Once everything definitely fit, Kath could glue in the sound deadening around the upper tunnel section and glue the carpet in the upper head of the tunnel. She then trimmed around the pipes and wires and lay in the tunnel section. The next step was to then put the centre console in over the carpet to make sure it still fits after each modification. The driver’s side and passenger tunnel section could then be glued in and packed out with foam to make a better fit.

Brian has made up the centre console by sanding and filling the cracks in the existing centre console switch unit. He’s glued the inner section and pushed the leather into place and followed it up by glueing the outer section and pulling it tight around all edges.

Brian could then cut the holes for the switches and fill the cracks. Once repaired and sanded, Brian was ready to glue the leather to the console, and start on the gearstick section by glueing and stretching the leather around all edges of the console. He then cut and trim the leather to get it to fit perfectly around the back of the console. Once these modifications were made, he could glue the leather and turn over the edges for the gearshift hole. Once these steps were completed, Brian fitted the console into the TR5.

TR5 Next Steps

Our Triumph TR5 has had a bespoke bumper iron made in the workshop to fit underneath behind the front wheel. One of our technicians made a template based off a similar car’s bumper iron and once he was happy, then made up the final design.

The TR5 has also entered the trim shop where our trim team are fitting the interior fabric. On this occasion, the client ordered a pack of TR5 interior pieces meaning we’re just fitting the sections rather than making them from hand. Although these sets are designed to fit perfectly, sometimes they need to be modified as every classic is unique. The majority of the work will include sticking and bolting each piece in place and ensuring that it all fits perfectly.

Kath began by adjusting and cutting around the corners of the panels so they fit well when applied later. The Kath glued the foam in place under the wheel arches and trimmed the excess material off along the seam of the wheel arch trim. Once done, she could glue in place the wheel arch cover and glue in the triangle piece down near the bottom door seal.

Kath also fitted the sound deadening and glued it in place throughout the vehicle. Once fitted in place, Kath then begun to trim along the sides of the sills to remove any extra deadening fabric.

Once complete, the passenger footwell carpet could be laid and the sill fitted to the drivers side.

Catching Up With The TR5

Our 1968 Triumph TR5 has been progressing in leaps and bounds under the expert eye of our technician Mauro.

Chris has painted the roof in DTM (direct to metal) satin black, making its smart and ready to be attached.

Mauro has attached the fuel pressure relief valve and installed the fuel lines, fitted the clutch master and slave cylinder, fitted the windscreen frame, sun visors and interior mirror. You might also notice that all the badges have been fitted along with the bumpers and chassis plate. This magnificent classic is now started to resemble a car again.

During our weekly deep clean (that goes alongside our daily workshop cleans), we emptied the workshop of all our cars whilst we tidied up the workshop. This allowed us to really get a good look at the TR5 off the frame.