europa

The Mince Pie Drive

On 1st December 2023, we set off on a festive adventure across the Suffolk countryside – our first-ever Mince Pie Drive. The day dawned bright

Read More »

The Mince Pie Drive


On 1st December 2023, we set off on a festive adventure across the Suffolk countryside – our first-ever Mince Pie Drive. The day dawned bright but extremely cold and icy. We decided to still venture out, albeit with a smaller convoy than first planned. The Bridge Classic Cars team wrapped up warm and headed out (special mention goes to our friends Garry Catchpole and Derek Rush for joining us).

The idea behind our Mince Pie Drive was to take classic cars to several local residential care homes to bring nostalgia and festive cheer to the residents and staff. There were mince pies, kindly provided by The Bakehouse Bakery Woodbridge, and carol singing from Molly and me (sorry about that folks!)

We went first to Highlands in Woodbridge before making our way to Bucklesham Grange Care Home, where we were greeted by the lovely Amanda-Jane Frank, who introduced us to the residents. Several came out to have a look at our cars, with Derek’s BMW proving to be a favourite here. Luke Deal from BBC Suffolk came along to chat with us and see what we were up to. You can listen to that interview here.


Next, we headed to Glebe House in Hollesley. The residents were just having their lunch, and talk about a meal with a view! The mince pies were a very welcome dessert! Lastly, whilst chasing the last hour of daylight, we popped to our neighbours at Lehmann House in Wickham Market.

We are so humbled by all the lovely residents and incredible care workers we met on our Mince Pie Drive. It was so wholesome to be able to remind them of yesteryear by bringing along a spectrum of cars. There really was something for everyone.

We can’t wait to do more events like this in future.

Final Repairs For Our Europa

Before our 1970 Lotus Europa goes live on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions, classic car technician Jonn has been making some final repairs.

The fuel gauge was reading full and off the scale. However, when the tank was drained there were 15 litres inside. Jonn was unable to remove the sender in situ as it had been bonded into the tank. As a result, Jonn had to strip and remove the fuel tank. He removed the fuel pump assembly from the top and removed the sender from the side after chipping away the old bonding material.

The mating surfaces were cleaned before the tank was rinsed and blown out. After it had been left to dry, Jonn manufactured a cork gasket for the fuel pump. He then fitted the fuel pump back in order and in the same position.

While waiting for a new sender, Jonn moved on to removing the steering wheel and switches so he could knock the old top steering column bush down further inside the tube. A new top column bush was fitted and lubricated in its place. The components were then all refitted in reverse order.

Jonn glued the repaired horn contacts and refitted the steering wheel. All the switches and the horn were tested and found to be working fine. Fixing points for the washer bag to hang in the front compartment were drilled and made before the connecting pipes were fitted.

Jonn also mounted the number plates.