classic jaguar E Type

E-Type Investigations

Classic car technician Jonn has been investigating some issues with our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. He found that the brake reservoir was not leaking

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E-Type Progress Continues

Classic car technicians Chris and Mauro have been continuing their work on our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5. Our interactive competition car is making good

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Our E-Type Returns

As much as we love seeing restored classic cars leave our workshop to be enjoyed by their owners, we can’t deny that we love seeing

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E-Type Investigations

Classic car technician Jonn has been investigating some issues with our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. He found that the brake reservoir was not leaking so this was rubbed down and masked up ready for painting.

After painting, the exposed metal areas were protected before everything was put back together and tested. The fan top cover was painted and refitted with new screws.

Jonn went on to drain and replace the coolant of our classic E-Type. While doing this, he noticed that the radiator drain plug had broken out of the radiator. Once the radiator was removed. the matrix looked like it had been leaking for a while as there are quite a few white stains on it.

E-Type Progress Continues

Classic car technicians Chris and Mauro have been continuing their work on our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5. Our interactive competition car is making good progress and it’s great to see it getting another step closer to going live on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions in the next few months.

After spending some time in the paint shop, our E-Type has now had some of its interior components painted as well as the body being primed and several parts of the body sanded ready for paint.

Our E-Type Returns

As much as we love seeing restored classic cars leave our workshop to be enjoyed by their owners, we can’t deny that we love seeing them again too.

Our 1972 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 has come back to us to investigate a fault with the clutch.

Classic car technician Scott has already started work on this beautiful classic car and found the fault to be with the master cylinder. He has removed the clutch master and slave ready to install new ones that have been ordered.

While he was investigating the clutch issue on our E-Type, Scott also removed and flushed out the clutch reservoir before refitting it.

It probably won’t be too long before our 1972 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 leaves us again but we will certainly make the most of seeing it every day until the time comes to say goodbye once more.

This Just In – 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster

Just arrived into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop at our Suffolk HQ is this 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster.

The classic Jaguar is in for our workshop team to carry out a series of jobs on the car. Firstly the car will be given a full service alongside a gearbox oil change to the upgrade 5-speed transmission. Then the team have been asked to replace both the differential oil and to drain and refill the coolant system for the V12.

The team will also carry out a full inspection and assessment on the E-Type for its owner and report back any of their findings.

Keep an eye out on the Bridge Classic Cars news page for more updates on the beautiful 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Roadster.

Good as New – New Brake Pads and Gearbox Oil for the 1970 Jaguar E-Type

The beautiful dark green 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 has been in the Bridge Classic Cars restoration workshop recently for the team to do a couple of jobs on the car.

First up, was to replace the front brake pads with a customer-specified pad compound from our friends over at EBC Brakes. The owner of this E-Type uses this car quite a bit and the car has been known to see some serious track time, so a set of EBC Green pads were chosen for the car.

After that, the team performed a gearbox service for the classic Jaguar. A full oil change for the big overdrive gearbox, and along with that the team could clean up some pieces and look into an ongoing issue with the overdrive unit itself. The restoration team removed the various springs and plungers for the overdrive unit and could get them on the bench to clean and inspect them closely. On inspection, the technician noted nothing of concern but once back in the car did make a record of the overdrive being sluggish to engage. The car will return to us later for some more pieces of work and the team can completely go through the overdrive system at that time.

But, with that, the work needed for the 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 was complete and the car was ready to head back home to its owner. Always a pleasure seeing this car in our workshops.

Covered Up – Finishing the Hood Cover on the 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 Roadster

The trim team at Bridge Classic Cars have been working on completing the last few jobs to do with the interior of the 1973 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 Roadster, Fern Grey.

The trim team have completed the handcrafted hood cover made specifically for Fern Grey. The team have hand-finished the piece by putting in the stud fasteners to the material to it can be held down tightly to the body of the classic Jaguar.

With this piece finished and put onto the car, the workshop team can continue with the final tests of the one-off E-type.

Blocked – Getting to the Bottom of the Fuel Leak in the 1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Series 3

The restoration technicians in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop have been looking into a fuel leak from the 1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Series 3.

The team inspected all the hoses and couplers to do with the fuel system which upon inspection were all found to be okay. From that, the team decided to look inside the tank of the V12 E-Type and found the cause of the issue.

The tank filter had become clogged with stones. This caused fuel to back up in the filter and leak through the seal which was causing the reported issue.

Ignition – Fitting Electronic Ignition to the 1973 Jaguar E Type Coupe

The technicians at Bridge Classic Cars have been getting through the list of jobs to get done on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Coupe.

The next job on the list was to fit a new electronic ignition into the 1970s GT car.

Removing the old system out of the car was done carefully while making note of each component, its condition and any wiring. With that out of the car, Jon could then get the new electronic ignition fitted.

A new distributor, coil, amplifier and resistor were fitted into the car and wired up under the bonnet of the E Type. He then ran all of the HT leads from each plug to the correct point on the distributor to get it in the right firing order. Then, after its first start and warm-up, Jon could set the timing and lock that in.

Upgrade – Upgrading the Suspension on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Coupe

The owner of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series 3 Coupe noted the ride had become hard and uncomfortable. We have some experience of getting E Types to comfortable and riding well which involves some suspension upgrades.

Much like with our 1973 E Type Roadster, we have fitted the Coupe with a set of adjustable Gaz shock absorbers with road springs. Our technician Jon has been working on completing the installation of the new parts into the front and rear of the E Type.

The reason for the adjustable GAZ dampers is so that the dynamics of the car can be set to exactly what the customer finds comfortable. An upgrade like this completely transforms a classic car and is becoming more and more popular for owners who get out and really use their classics.

Diagnostics – Testing the Heater Valve on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Coupe

Our restoration technician, Jon, has been working on trying to get the heater valve on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Coupe.

After finally being able to free off the valve, he discovered that this still didn’t fix the issue of the heater being on constantly. For this, Jon has advised that this component be replaced. All other parts of the heating system are working as they should be except the heater valve.

There’s more to come on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Coupe very soon.

Brackets – Preparing the Hardtop Brackets for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The brackets which hold down the hardtop of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster have been in the Bridge Classic Cars paint shop.

With the hardtop recently test fit onto the car, the restoration technicians needed the brackets to be finished for the car in order to finish the installation.

Once these have hardened and cured, they will go onto the car and fix to the hardtop and the body.

New Shoes – Fresh Tyres on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The Bridge Classic Cars team have managed to source a set of tyres for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III known as Fern Grey.

Fern Grey will soon begin road tests and with that, we felt it needed a new set of tyres. At the request of the owner, we have sourced the closest we can get to the original tyres as possible but with a modern compound. Originally the tyres would have had a 215 section tyre but these tyres are a 205 section from Pirelli.

With tyres mounted thanks to Tyre Assist, our in-house restoration technicians can now move forward on the checklist before road testing this incredible one of a kind E Type.

Systems Check – Check Over of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster ‘Fern Grey’ is getting closer to beginning its road tests here at Bridge Classic Cars.

Scott, our in-house restoration technician in charge of the build of Fern Grey, has begun going through and completing his electrics and wiring checks on the one of a kind E Type. Scott has also been going through and fitting all the necessary covers and shields under the bonnet of the E Type.

After Scott has completed all of these tests and checks on the Roadster, it will then begin its series of road tests and inspections to make sure the car is 100% ready for handover to its very lucky owner.

Final Details – Fitting the Bonnet and Wiring Changes to the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The team at Bridge Classic Cars are on the final stretch in getting the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster ready for road testing.

One of the biggest and most delicate jobs of the whole build was fitting the bonnet to this one-off E Type. Carefully (and using almost everyone in the workshop) the bonnet was gently lowered onto the nose of Fern Grey. Once in place, our technicians Jon and Scott could begin the task of firmly attaching all the necessary brackets and braces to secure the bonnet to the car. Along with our bodywork expert Chris, the team worked on getting the hinges and clips aligned so the bonnet sat perfectly on this beautiful car.

Along with the bonnet being fitted, the team went through the car to add some last-minute adjustments. A new passenger grab handle was made and fitted by Brian, our lead in-house trimmer, and the headlights have been removed and rewired for a new pair that feature sidelights incorporated into the unit themselves.

It’s all coming together on Fern Grey, so keep a look out on the Bridge Classic Cars news page for updates on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster.

Small Details – Post Test Checks on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Bridge Classic Cars in-house restoration technicians, Jon and Scott, have been working on some minor repairs and revisions to Fern Grey after its tests.

Fern Grey is of course the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster we have been building in our Suffolk HQ. After the tests, Jon and Scott noticed some issues with a couple of interior/dash lights which were solved by removing the cover plate and rerouting some of the elaborate wiring with a few pins needing to be recrimped and shielded.

Along with that, Jon has made a new fuel return pipe for the car as he found the original was not returning correctly to the fuel tank. So, with all of the underside jobs finished on Fern Grey Jon could begin to fit the shields to the underside of this one-off E Type.

Now, with everything buttoned up on Fern Grey, our technicians can begin retesting and rechecking the car before its road tests begin.

Catches and Hinges – Fitting up the Bonnet Hardware on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Roadster

Our in-house restoration technicians, Jon and Scott, have been preparing the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop.

They have been fitting up the refurbished and new hardware to the firewall and the front frame of the E Type ready for when the gorgeous one-piece bonnet of Fern Grey is fitted. Before then, our technicians want to test run the V12 and all of its systems whilst they have easy access to the engine bay for any adjustments or changes to be made.

Soon, you will see a big move ahead with the E Type here on the Bridge Classic Cars news page.

Preflight Checks – Final Trim and Bolt Check on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Bridge Classic Cars in-house restoration technicians Jon and Scott have been going through Fern Grey, the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster, to bolt check every component and to fit the final pieces of trim before its engine/road tests begin shortly.

Scott and Jon got the windscreen pillar trims in place but before then, fitted the all-important VIN plate to the pillar. With these in place, our technicians could then start from the front of the car and work their way back.

Scott and Jon also fitted the new driveshaft covers at the back of Fern Grey while also securing the split pins through the shock absorber bolts after making sure they were correctly tightened. The nut and bolt check is crucial before the vehicle is moved under its own power, so the technicians went round twice to make sure everything was done up tight.

Soon, you’ll see the testing of Fern Grey begin by our in-house team so keep a look out on the Bridge Classic Cars news page for more updates.

The Small Touches – Polishing the Rear Valance of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The Bridge Classic Cars in-house restoration team have been getting together all the final touches on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster, Fern Grey.

One of the final pieces to finish off the rear end is the new valance cover. Our technician, Jon, spent hours getting the finish just right on the piece which is somewhat of a centre-piece for the back of the bespoke E Type.

With the valance fitted and the other brightwork in place, the rear end of Fern Grey is near enough complete.

Ready for Brightwork – Ready for Chrome on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The team at Bridge Classic Cars have begun work on the stunning bonnet of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster we have built for a client. With all of the weatherstripping installed into the headlight surrounds, they can now begin with the final brightwork.

All of the chrome for Fern Grey was sent off to a specialist, Wyatt Polishing, for refurbishment and polishing to make sure it looked as good as the rest of the incredible car. Now Paul, one of our in-house technicians, will start the meticulous task of getting the chrome back onto the headlights ready for when the bonnet is finally installed onto the car in the coming weeks.

Expect to see a lot more on the progress of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster here on the Bridge Classic Cars newspage.

Extra Touches – Creating New Bags for the 1974 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Lydia, one of our incredible trimmers here at Bridge Classic Cars, has been busy handmaking the extra pieces for Fern Grey. Fern Grey is of course the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster that our in-house restoration teams have been working on rebuilding from the ground up for a client of ours.

Lydia began by remaking the original tool wrap that was supplied originally with the car. It had seen better days and was not befitting of such a creation as the mighty Fern Grey. So, using the original as a template, Lydia remade the piece by hand to fit the same fit and finish as the car it will belong to.

Then, with the E Types new tonneau cover completed, Lydia began to hand make the bag which the cover folds into to be stowed away. Much like the tool wrap, Lydia has made it to the same extraordinary standards as the rest of the car.

Final Fitment – Fitting the Exhaust to the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The Bridge Classic Cars in-house restoration technicians have finished up the custom-made exhaust on the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster that we refer to as Fern Grey.

Paul has been working on getting the new exhaust safe and secure underneath the iconic sports car. From the exhaust collector to the stunning, bright double-tipped outlet which perfectly follows the line of the bottom of Fern Grey.

With the new exhaust fitted underneath the E Type, our in-house restoration technicians can move forward wit the final assembly of this stunning classic Jaguar.

Coated – Exhaust for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster, Fern Grey, is getting closer to completion by the day. Recently our in-house restoration technicians have been working on completing the exhaust for this amazing project.

Our technician Paul has been working on cleaning, preparing and coating the exhausts for the 5 litre V12 that sits at the heart of this E Type. Paul carefully cleaned and prepared the original headers for the car before applying several coats of glossy black exhaust paint. This paint is specific for the use on exhausts as it can withstand incredible high temperatures and the environment.

Paul also worked on cleaning and painting the exhaust brackets for Fern Grey to match the rest of the immaculate underside of the car.

Finishing Touches – 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The Bridge Classic Cars in-house have been finishing the final pieces for the interior of Fern Grey, the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster before it goes into the main workshop for final assembly.

Brian, our head trimmer, has got the cars handmade seats back into the car to complete that part of the interior and they look absolutely fantastic. This car is intended to be a true GT car so they are comfortable and well-padded to add to that sense of comfort while covering huge distances.

Next, Brian began fitting up the Hardura padding underneath the dashboard. Hardura is a vinyl wrapped sound deadening material used in place where it is remained exposed and is also close to the original style material used on the car.

Then, for the final piece Brian fitted the chrome stalks from the old sun visors onto the new pieces. These were then fitted up into the car and really finish of the dash and windshield surround.

Lifting the Cover – Tonneau Cover for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Our head trimmer here at Bridge Classic Cars, Brian, has been perfectly tailoring a tonneau cover to protect the interior of Fearn Grey. The 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster we have been restoring in-house.

Brian has masterfully created the new cover entirely from scratch using his wealth of knowledge and experience to produce a tight, elegant fit on the cover. Just like every piece on Fearn Grey, our restorations teams have tailored everything around the car and for the lucky owner of this stunning roadster.

There are a couple more jobs to do in our trim shop on the E Type and then it will be going into the workshop for the team to begin final assembly.

Raising the Roof – Fitting the Soft Top to the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series 3 Roadster

The Bridge Classic Cars trim shop have been incredibly busy just before Christmas. One of the jobs that has been done was fitting the foldable soft top into Fearn Grey, the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series 3 Roadster.

Brian, our head trimmer, has been carefully pulling and stretching the new material into place and securing it to the spars on the hood to make sure that the fit and finish on the soft top is perfect with no creases or loose spots. Once it was in place, Brian could then focus on testing the mechanism worked flawlessly up and down without binding up or damaging the new soft top material in any way.

Along with the completely refurbished hard top, Fearn Grey is looking absolutely sensational! and the interior is definitely a massive part of that process.

Bits and Pieces – Continuing on the Interior of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Brian in the Bridge Classic Cars in-house trim shop has been continuing on his highly skilled work on the interior of Fern Grey, the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster.

Brian has been working on test and final fitting the various small trim pieces onto the car. One of the big jobs is making sure the recently finished dash and windscreen trim to fit and flow correctly across the front of the interior of this stunning sports car. With the pieces in their final place, Brian could begin working his way towards the back of the car.

Brian also worked on the soft top where it meets the windscreen trims to ensure all of the trims for the soft top also worked alongside the various windscreen pieces. Any adjustments or refinements could be completed piece by piece to get the best fit for every different aspect of the interior.

Then, in the rear of Fern Grey, Brian began to get the new rear panels into place and make sure they perfectly fit around the hinges and mechanism for the soft top while up, but also when it is folded down into place.

As you can see, its full steam ahead on Fern Grey in the trim shop! And it is looking fantastic.

Out & About – Charlotte’s New York Car Spotting at MoMA

Charlotte, our Bridge Classic Cars Competitions presenter, has been off on holiday but she’ll always manage to find something cool and classic for us back home. This time, she found a familiar friend in the Big Apple.

Whilst in New York, Charlotte went to MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) and one of the exhibitions was to do with AutoMania and what better way to sum that up than with a gorgeous early E Type Droptop. A car we here at Bridge Classic Cars have an undeniable soft spot for and definitely deserves its place in a museum dedicated to modern works of art.

Hope you had an amazing time Charlotte! but you’ll all be able to see her tomorrow night for the live draw of the Mustang and the Mercedes 250SE. There is still time to get your tickets!

Click the link below for your chance to win your very own dream classic.

www.bridgeclassiccarscompetitions.co.uk

The Next Phase – Dash and Hood Pieces for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

Brian, Kath and Lydia have been working on the next phase of the interior for the 1973 Jaguar E Type Roadster that Bridge Classic Cars calls Fern Grey. Now that the windscreen has been fitted and cured, it’s time to start getting the trim, dash and hood in place.

Using the original dash panels and A-Pillar trims, Brian stripped apart the panels ready to be recovered. The original foam for these pieces was in remarkably good condition so they were refreshed and reused. The trimming in the rich black leather however is all brand new. Brian selected a hide that compliments the rest of the interior but also matches closely what would have originally been used on the E Type’s to trim the pieces with.

Each of the panels and trims was hand-cut and finished by the Bridge Classic Cars in-house trim team to ensure the best fit. Including the dash pad which now that the windscreen is safely in place could be secured to the top of the dash after test fitting multiple times.

With all of the dash and trim around the windscreen fitted, Brian and the team began to work on getting the foldable hood mechanism in place. Checking the mounting points for the front and back of the hood, Brian began the task of gently manipulating the mounts to ensure the best possible fit as well as making sure each of the spars sat level and true. Thankfully after some skilled moving, the hood sat perfectly inside the gorgeous roadster.

Pieces of the Puzzle – Installing the Windscreen of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster

The windscreen of the 1973 Jaguar E Type Series III Roadster is now in the car!

This moment has been a long time coming. The curving and elegant windscreen for the E Type is like a jewel in its crown. This completely bespoke Jaguar has been cherished by the in-house restoration teams at Bridge Classic Cars throughout its build so, having one of the final aesthetic pieces complete was a true milestone.

For windscreen removal and installs, we use a local specialist called Car Glass and Trim who we have worked with for many years. Their technicians came out to install the glass into Fern Grey with the same attention to detail and care as our very own technicians. With the windscreen and its seals in place, it was time to let the adhesives cure while Kath and Brian in the trim shop carry on fitting out the E Type.

Falling Inline – The Story of the Jaguar XK Straight-Six

Jaguar. A legendary name in both performance and luxury. Just the name is enough to conjure images of elegant, long-legged coupes and saloons powered by the now infamous XK straight-six engine. But, what is the story behind this incredible powerhouse which lived 1000 different lives?

Debuting in 1949, the XK straight-six came with a sizeable 3.4-litre displacement, it was the brainchild of four very important icons in the Jaguar world. Sir William Lyons, William Heynes, Walter Hassan and Claude Bailey. The introduction of this engine however stretches back nearly a decade before. During World War II when the company still went under the name SS Cars, the team were actively seeking and developing replacements for its engine lineup so, during its wartime efforts they worked on the new powerplants for its post-war cars. Jaguar had begun to produce and develop the engine just after the nightmares of war had begun to subside at the end of the 1940s. The cornerstone of these engines was to be higher output, higher quality and higher style, thus the XK Inline-Six was born.

The XK engines first saw service in 1947 with the 3.2-litre units (XJ 6 Cylinder) but during testing of the engines, it was found they severely lacked low-end torque, so the blocks were bored out to 3.4 litres (XK 6 Cylinder) and were destined to be the beating heart of one of the most beautiful cars ever made, the XK120 which broke cover at the 1948 London Motor Show. This would then see the engines fitted to the upcoming MkVII’s and countless other models over its production run.

The cast-iron engine blocks were not the lightest but were highly durable. The construction techniques developed for this engine would push other manufacturers to refine and develop new and improved engines to try and match the level that Jaguar was achieving. Jaguar fitted special vibration dampers to the crankshaft of the engine to absorb and limit the number of frequencies travelling through the crankshaft and ultimately the XK’s split case engine design.

In 1951, Jaguar began work on developing the idea of a smaller displacement but still useable version of XK straight-six. The results for the 2-litre engine were mixed and by 1954 the engine had grown to become a 2.4-litre unit. The engine itself was actually shorted than the bigger displacement engines but remained under the same name and architecture. These engines would be put forward to power the upcoming stylish and sleek saloon, the MkI. The road engines were entirely carburetted until 1978 (the first year of road engines being fuel injected for the US market) but would use a combination of two or three SU’s. Webers or Zenith carburettors except for the MkII 240 which had a set of downdraught Solex units.

From this, all the subsequent Jaguar XK straight-sixes were laid out. Short block engines would make up the smaller displacements such as the 2.4 and 2.8-litre engines and the longer, more torquey powerplants would go anywhere from 3.4 to 4.2 litres by the end of its production. Jaguar officially retired the XK 6-cylinder in 1992 replaced by the newly developed AJ6 platform it used alongside the faithful XK until the AJ6 was then also retired in 1996.

During this incredible engines lifetime, it would see all manner of changes and applications. From racing to agricultural work. Le Mans to Leicester and beyond. This incredible piece of not only industrial design but of engineering excellence and durability should be remembered and revered for the legend it surely is.

Long live the XK Straight-Six.