prewar car specialist

Handmade – New Coolant Pipes for the 1905 Riley 9HP

The restoration team at Bridge Classic Cars have been working hard on recreating the coolant system on the 1905 Riley 9HP.

Our technician Dave has been busy carefully making up new coolant pipework for the 117-year-old tourer. These are being made from brass and copper, as it would have been originally. For this, Dave removed the water pump from the engine block after taking countless measurements in order to create a jig that meant Dave could more accurately solder the entire piece without worrying about it moving.

After this, everything could be test fit back onto the car. Dave remade the now long-gone gaskets by hand before the pipework was tested and then painted in the glossy black.

A New Look – Chassis and Parts of the 1905 Riley 9HP Painted

The chassis and engine from the 1905 Riley 9HP has recently been delivered back to the Bridge Classic Cars Suffolk HQ after being blasted by local specialists.

After being brought back, the paint team thoroughly cleaned down every part before taking it into our in-house paint booth. The team then set-up the system to finish the whole unit in a beautiful gloss black as it would have been originally.

We’re excited to see the restoration of the 1905 Riley 9HP progress even further very soon!

Finer Details – Rebuilding the 1905 Riley 9HP Rear Differential and Swing Arm

The 1905 Riley 9HP has had its rear differential and suspension pulled off the chassis to be moved to the workbench for the Bridge Classic Cars workshop to rebuild/refresh.

After testing last week, the team pulled the pieces from the chassis to pull apart and rebuild. The rear differential has had new ball bearings and races put in and everything cleaned up and regreased. The rear swing arms were also pulled out to be inspected and the mounting holes redrilled and cleaned for the new shackle bolts to slip through with no binding.

Finally, the team have been working on the spark plugs for the car and inspecting the correct gaps and spacing on the new adapter.

Driving Forward – Driveshafts of the 1905 Riley 9HP in the Car

The team at Bridge Classic Cars have performed the first test fit of the new driveshafts in our 1905 Riley 9HP.

They have been fit into the antique, pre-world war 1 Riley to check for fitment and interference. Also, for the team to check the bearing clearances and ring-gear engagement.

There’s a fair bit going on at the moment with the vintage Riley at our Suffolk HQ so make sure to keep an eye on the Bridge Classic Cars news page for more.

Collection and Delivery – Collecting the 1905 Riley 9HP Radiator and Dropping Off at Specialist

The radiator of the 1905 Riley 9HP has been collected from Devon in order for it to be taken to a specialist and refurbished ready for the restoration of the car here at the Bridge Classic Cars HQ in Suffolk.

Our director Gordon made the drive down to the West Country to collect the radiator from our friend Carl who picked up the radiator from the auction house who originally found it and got in touch with us about it.

From there, Gordon made his way through Devon but stopped in Padstow where he couldn’t help but stop and stare at the stunning Caterham Superlight.

After the stop, it was onwards to the guys over at Newquay and Exeter Radiators where the now 117-year-old piece will be refurbished and restored for the car. The guys at Newquay and Exeter Radiators wasted no time beginning to assess the radiator and showing the damage and solder work previously done to the component.

We’re really looking forward to getting hold of this incredible piece of the puzzle that is our 1905 Riley 9HP.

As Good as New – Paint Repair on the 1930 Packard 740 Waterfield Convertible

Alan, one of our expert painters here at Bridge Classic Cars, has been hard at work preparing and painting the wings on the 1930 Packard 740 Waterfield Convertible.

Carefully, Alan masked off the wing and began to take back the deep maroon paintwork step by step. After the piece had been taken back far enough, Alan got to work getting the panel into primer. Using our state of the art paint matching computer, Alan was able to exactly match the same tone and shade of maroon that features so prominently on this incredible pre-war car.

Once the paint had cured properly, Alan could then begin the process of cutting the paint back using a series of abrasives. Beginning with a 1500 grit wet and dry paper to remove any imperfection, he then step up to 3000 grit and then 6000 grit in order to achieve the perfect finish before it was then machine polished.