E-Type

An E-Type Arrives

Tony recently collected our 1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster. When it arrived, James carried out a service/appraisal. He put the battery on charge and carried out

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Work Begins Again

Now that our 1967 Jaguar E-Type Racing Series 1 is back in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop, classic car technician Jonn has begun his work

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Fixing An Air Con Issue

Classic car technician Steve has been resolving an issue with the air conditioning in our 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3. After removing the dash,

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Chrome Fitting

As the time gets closer to our biggest competition to date, our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5, going live on the Bridge Classic Cars Competitions

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A New Mirror

Classic car technician Steve has been working on our beautiful 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3. He has fitted a new passenger side wing mirror

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Working On Our E-Type

Classic car technician Jonn has continued his work on our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. This time he has been looking at the cooling system.

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An E-Type Returns

Our 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3 has come back into the workshop for some attention while its owner is back home in France. Classic

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E-Type Investigations

Classic car technician Jonn has been investigating some issues with our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. He found that the brake reservoir was not leaking

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E-Type Dash

Classic car technician, and workshop manager, John has been rebuilding the dash of our very special 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 competition project. Once this

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E-Type Progress Continues

Classic car technicians Chris and Mauro have been continuing their work on our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5. Our interactive competition car is making good

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Brakes And More

All of the brakes on our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 have been bled by classic car technician John. After bleeding the front brakes, John

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Refitting An Engine

John has been preparing our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 for its engine to be reinstalled. A new clutch was fitted and the gearbox and

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A Special Project

A very special project has recently arrived at Bridge Classic Cars in the form of our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 The former owners of

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Inspecting Our E-Type

Our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 has returned to the Bridge Classic Cars workshop to investigate and resolve some issues that the owner has been

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An E-Type Returns

Our 1967 Jaguar E-Type Racing Series 1 has recently returned to the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. Coming back to be re-painted, it won’t be too

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Our E-Type Returns

As much as we love seeing restored classic cars leave our workshop to be enjoyed by their owners, we can’t deny that we love seeing

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A New Exhaust Fitted

A new stainless steel exhaust has been fitted to our 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Series 3 by classic car technician Paul. While Paul was working

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E-Type Suspension

Classic car technician Paul has been working on the suspension of our 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 Series 3. He installed new poly bushes to the

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E-Type MOT day!

Both the Jaguar E-Types pictured had their MOT’s done yesterday. The gold 1971 Jaguar E-Type V12 Series 3 is currently with us for storage at

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An E-Type Arrives

Tony recently collected our 1969 Jaguar E-Type Roadster.

When it arrived, James carried out a service/appraisal. He put the battery on charge and carried out a full inspection of the car. All the brakes and tyres were checked, including the pressure of the spare. The brakes were all good so James removed the carpet and inspected the plug to check the gear oil. This was ok, as was the rear diff oil.

James noticed slight oil leaks from the engine, high up and the rocker covers are showing signs of weeping. He checked all of the lights, washers, wipers, and signals. The horn was not working.

There was a small drop of oil on the rear diff and gearbox. The spare tyre was flat but the tyre and wheel rim were new with no visible puncture.

James went on to grease the rear suspension and drive shafts. The offside rear outer suspension arm was cracked slightly and the grease nipple was loose. The exhaust front pipe was slightly damaged on the lower edge which James thinks could be due to height.

The oil and filter were drained/replaced along with the air filter and spark plugs. Then James investigated the horn not working. The relay that controls the horn was checked, and the horns worked when powered separately. The earth from the steering wheel switch was checked as ok, but there was a live feed missing from the relay. This was traced back to the fuse box, there was no continuity through the fuse despite it looking to be in good condition. A replacement fuse was fitted, and the horns worked, the old fuse was found to be broken internally despite its external appearance.

He then moved on to the oil leak. Both rocker covers were removed, along with the camshaft end plates (these can leak too). All residue of excess sealant was removed from the old seals and mating areas, and then the correct sealant was added to the cylinder heads and rocker covers. New gaskets were fitted, the the covers were installed with new copper sealing washers and tightened. The oil residue was cleaned from the engine, and then new oil was added and the car was run up to recheck for leaks from the rocker covers area and new oil filter.

All maintenance points were greased and levels checked and topped up, tyres checked for pressure and depth, and lights and wiper operation confirmed ahead of an MOT test. The battery was charged but appears low still, so replacement is recommended. Visual inspection of brake and suspension components was all ok.

An E-Type Photoshoot – How we captured our 1967 Jaguar Series 1 Racing E-Type for Auction

Our 1967 Jaguar E-Type Racing Series 1 is for sale by auction right now on Car & Classic.

To prepare for this, Tom and Myself headed over to the former RAF Bentwaters to shoot the car during the worst flooding scene in our area for nearly 40 years.

After gently driving the road-going racer across the site and into the infamous Hush House (the former engine test facility when the base was active). After getting the car in position, we took our time to carefully clean down the car ready for the shoot. It looked incredible under the down lights in the stark and industrial building, a complete contrast against its vibrant and eye catching Volcano Orange paintwork. After the car was cleaned down, we head into the control room where so many test engineers had gone before and hit the lights…

This wasn’t going to be like any other shoot though. We had decided to try something different and really push ourselves creatively in a short amount of time. Thinking back to the incredible photo shoot with our Chevron Formula 2 car, which had been shot by Freddie several years before in the same place, we decided to capture the racing E-Type using long exposures and carefully painting light across the bodywork and accents of the car as well as trying light painting through the background to give it a little more of an ethereal, artistic feel.

Here are some of the results:

Using our tripod and the cameras exposures set to around between 10 and 30 seconds, with the cameras light sensitivity turned all the way down. We began capturing the exterior shots of the car. With myself on the controls of the camera and Tom armed with a single diffused studio light (connected to a portable power pack), we began to slow work our way around the car using the studio light to paint the light over certain areas of the car to give it correct exposure but also to amplify the wonderful form and curves of the vintage E-Type.

Because of the amount of moisture in the air (we shot this at the height of the local storms, and hence why the car was shot inside) the headlights remained fogged up which adds to the vicious look of this road-going racer.

To capture the detail shots of the car, or ‘beauties’ as we refer to them here in the marketing department, we adopted the same approach of carefully dancing the highlights across the bodywork after triple checking the triple checks to make sure the focus was laser sharp on the area we needed.

Things like the Monza filler, a distinct feature on our E-Type, or the quintessential rear lights all had to be captured this way. Although more time consuming, allowed us to achieve the best result. For a few hours, it was a case of systematically going through every angle and aspect of the car with Tom, to capture everything that we needed. The trickiest part of the shoot, was actually the interior.

Because most the interior is covered by the roof, it tends to be the darkest aspect of the car. It’s also the easiest part to be able to see reflections in as almost from every angle you have a glass surface.

Once all of the essential photos were ticked off the list, it gave myself and Tom a bit of time to experiment with some more ‘artistic’ style shots to round off the shoot and add a sense of flair to this one of a kind classic.

Continuing with the use of long exposures to capture enough light to correctly show the car but also show off the menacing and purposeful character of our E-Type, we decided to play with highlights and framing. Using the torches on our smart phones, we worked our way round the car at speed to highlight the haunches and lines, while also creating patterns and shapes to display the car inside of what was essentially a stark and empty background.

The results, are something that we as a team are very proud of capturing for the auction of the car with our friends at Car & Classic.

Also, we offer full photo shoots with your pride and joy by the team here at Bridge Classic Cars. Click here and inquire.

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Work Begins Again

Now that our 1967 Jaguar E-Type Racing Series 1 is back in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop, classic car technician Jonn has begun his work on getting it ready to get back out on the road.

In the early stages of this new round of work, we are looking forward to seeing what the future holds for our racing E-Type.

New Wheels For Our E-Type

Some new wheels have arrived for our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5. As this is now live on the Bridge Classic Cars Competitions website, it’s great to see this example of one of the most recognisable (and iconic) classic cars move into the finishing stages of its build.

Fixing An Air Con Issue

Classic car technician Steve has been resolving an issue with the air conditioning in our 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3.

After removing the dash, Steve was able to gain access to the a/c wiring and control switches. The fault was traced back to the a/c control variable resistor switch so this was taken apart, the contacts cleaned, and put back together.

Steve tested the air conditioning afterwards and everything was working as it should.

Chrome Fitting

As the time gets closer to our biggest competition to date, our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5, going live on the Bridge Classic Cars Competitions website, work has been picking up pace as the restoration comes to an end.

One of the latest jobs to be completed was done by workshop manager John as he fitted the window chromes.

As we move into the finishing touches phase of the project, these little jobs go a long way in making our E-Type look as good as we know it will.

A New Mirror

Classic car technician Steve has been working on our beautiful 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3.

He has fitted a new passenger side wing mirror to our classic E-Type which will be with us for a few more weeks until its owner arrives back from France to pick it up.

We look forward to seeing the car and owner reunited very soon.

Getting Competition Ready

You won’t have to wait too much longer until you will have the chance to win our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 through Bridge Classic Cars Competitions.

Classic car technician Brian has been doing lots of work on the interior of what was once said to be “the most beautiful car ever made”. He has fitted a new cover to the cubby box lid as well as doing an impressive job of fitting the headliner too.

Brian went on to stick the dodo mat sound-deadening panels to the floor, transmission tunnel, and under the rear seat. The chrome channels of the rear seat were cleaned and rubber strips were made and fitted to these.

While Brian was working inside our classic E-Type, John was fitting the boot stay.

Work continues on our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 and we are looking forward to keeping you updated on its restoration progress.

If you want a more detailed look at our E-Type project, it was featured in our most recent episode of Talking Classics.

Working On Our E-Type

Classic car technician Jonn has continued his work on our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. This time he has been looking at the cooling system. Jonn fitted the vacuum tool and used it to refill the system.

When the car was run up to temperature, the radiator was found to be weeping. This was removed ready for a new one to be fitted. Mounts were fitted to the new radiator. The offside mount needed to be modified to make sure it cleared the bottom outlet. Once this was done, Jonn fitted the fan switch to the new radiator – this also needed a modified earth wire.

The system was vacuum filled again and, this time, the vacuum was not lost. The fans are now running as intended with no leaks found.

An E-Type Returns

Our 1973 Jaguar E-Type Roadster Series 3 has come back into the workshop for some attention while its owner is back home in France.

Classic car technician Steve has been taking a closer look at the vehicle and noticed that there was oil around the filter housing. Oil was also found on the side of the engine, which Steve believed could be coming from the oil feed pipe. More oil was also present around the side of the gearbox and sump.

To find out where the leak was coming from, Steve cleaned all of the areas and applied a leak detector. The oil leak was found to be coming from the back of the engine, specifically, the filler tube. A slight leak was also found to be coming from the solenoid terminal and the oil filter housing.

Steve checked that the breather system was ok and not blocked before moving on to resolving the leaks.

While working on our stunning E-Type, Steve also fitted a new bonnet catch and latch.

E-Type Investigations

Classic car technician Jonn has been investigating some issues with our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2. He found that the brake reservoir was not leaking so this was rubbed down and masked up ready for painting.

After painting, the exposed metal areas were protected before everything was put back together and tested. The fan top cover was painted and refitted with new screws.

Jonn went on to drain and replace the coolant of our classic E-Type. While doing this, he noticed that the radiator drain plug had broken out of the radiator. Once the radiator was removed. the matrix looked like it had been leaking for a while as there are quite a few white stains on it.

E-Type Dash

Classic car technician, and workshop manager, John has been rebuilding the dash of our very special 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 competition project.

Once this iconic classic car has been fully rebuilt, it will be the biggest competition we have ever launched through Bridge Classic Cars Competitions as the car will be available to win.

Before that though, work will continue on the rebuild of our E-Type project.

E-Type ZP Collection – A Tribute To The First Racing E-Types

Jaguar Classic is celebrating the iconic race-winning E-Types by creating seven exclusive pairs of E-Type ZP Collection vehicles. The luxury (and highly collectable) cars pay homage to the first E-types used in competition. These racing E-Types were originally produced under the project name “ZP” and, within months of their introduction in 1961, they picked up their first victories.

Each of the commemorative pairs includes a drophead coupe and a fixed-head coupe, both finished in liveries paying tribute to the original race-winning cars. The two cars that provided inspiration for this incredible project were referred to by their registration numbers ‘ECD 400’ and ‘BUY 1’ and were driven by Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori.

Paul Barritt, Director of Jaguar Classic, said: “The E-type ZP Collection is the ultimate tribute to the E-type’s triumphant racing debut, in itself part of Jaguar’s rich motorsport history. Each pair tells a fascinating, and often untold, story of the E-type’s history. The ZP Collection honours not only the vehicles but the racers who drove them to victory on the track. With 2,000 hours lovingly spent on each vehicle by the craftspeople at Jaguar Classic, our discerning clients will be able to enjoy a unique tribute to two of the greatest cars in the E-type’s history.”


If this E-Type project wasn’t special enough, later this year, the personalisation team at Jaguar will be unveiling a limited-edition production run of matching F-Type ZP Editions. These will be inspired by the E-Type ZP collection and will also only have seven pairs available. The fourteen 5-litre supercharged V8 F-Types will be reserved for E-Type ZP Collection clients meaning that each client could own an unrepeatable and historic quartet of very special vehicles. It’s worth keeping in mind that, from 2025, Jaguar will become a pure electric modern luxury brand so this looks to be something of an unforgettable swan song.

Indigo Blue E-Type Drophead Coupe

In honour of Graham Hill’s Indigo Blue E-Type drophead coupe, the E-Type in the ZP collection will be finished in Oulton Blue and will have a black hood along with bonnet roundels finished in white with matching front ‘lipstick’ around the inside of the front airtake.

The interior is finished in red leather by Bridge of Weir and in-period Hardura trim.

Unlike the original E-Type, driven by Graham Hill, though, the ZP collection hasn’t been developed for just racing so the engineers at Jaguar Classic have reworked and hand-finished the nose of these very special cars.


Crystal Grey E-Type Fixed-Head Coupe

Like the Oulton Blue version, the Crystal Grey fixed-head coupe comes with white roundels and similar exterior detailing, including the removal of the motif bar and Jaguar badge across the grille. The Crystal Grey coupe also has the same chrome bumpers as the drop-head, along with the welded bonnet louvres and unique side graphic detail.

The interior features a Dark Navy Bridge of Weir leather with matching Hardura trim and a Beechwood steering wheel.


E-Type ZP Collection Changes

The most significant mechanical upgrade to these stunning tributes is the specially developed five-speed manual transmission for quieter, more comfortable cruising. It features synchromesh on all ratios, helical cut gears and a reinforced cast aluminium casing for enhanced reliability and durability, with closer gear ratios for smoother changes.

An Extra Tribute With The E-Type ZP Collection

Every vehicle in the collection undergoes 2,000 hours of work by the experts at Jaguar Classic to make sure each and every one is a perfect tribute. Each one comes with a tailor-made car cover with ZP logo and a bespoke jack with a unique storage bag to be stored beneath the boot floor.

A period helmet to match those worn by Hill and Salvadori is also included. These have been crafted by British expert Bill Vero of Everoak and are a beautiful display piece that can be worn, and hand adjusted for each client. The helmets are provided with a tailored leather storage bag crafted from the same leather as the interiors and made onsite by the expert in-house trimmers at Jaguar Classic. The helmet bag also complements the leather pouch for the vehicle handbook, which is made with the same leather by the same team.

E-Type Progress Continues

Classic car technicians Chris and Mauro have been continuing their work on our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5. Our interactive competition car is making good progress and it’s great to see it getting another step closer to going live on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions in the next few months.

After spending some time in the paint shop, our E-Type has now had some of its interior components painted as well as the body being primed and several parts of the body sanded ready for paint.

Primer For A Special E-Type

Our very special 1968 Jaguar E-Type has been in the Bridge Classic Cars paint shop with Chris and Mauro. They have been applying primer to the bonnet of this future competition car.

What makes this car so special is that you will be able to help us make some of the decisions along the way as we work to restore and rebuild our E-Type.

As you can see from the images below, our 1968 Jaguar E-Type is beginning to look very good and we look forward to getting you involved with its progress very soon.

Brakes And More

All of the brakes on our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 have been bled by classic car technician John. After bleeding the front brakes, John reassembled the front suspension. All the brakes were bled as it was noticed that the brake fluid looked high in water content.

John went on to clean and fit new bonnet bushes and pins. He rewired the loom to the bonnet as it was hard-wired to it previously – John had to cut the wires to remove the bonnet. Once the bonnet was refitted, the wiring was completed and connected to the inside of the bonnet and to the new connector plug.

The bonnet ram was cleaned and repainted before John went on to refit the stereo and interior. While doing this, he noticed that the horn and the main beam flash weren’t working. After checking and replacing the fuse, John found some ‘interesting’ wiring behind the dash which had been done prior to coming to us.

Exhaust blow was coming from the downpipes so these were removed, cleaned, and resealed. The thread of 3 studs had gone so these were removed and replaced with nuts and bolts instead. After tightening and testing, everything was working as it should.

Refitting An Engine

John has been preparing our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 for its engine to be reinstalled.

A new clutch was fitted and the gearbox and overdrive unit were refitted too. John also painted various suspension pieces black where the paint had chipped off previously.

As the engine installation continued, John began making the connections and refitting the ancillaries. The sump bung thread was bad so the bung wouldn’t tighten. This was stripped and tapped out so a new helicoil could be fitted. The bung was then refitted with PTFE tape and sealer.

The overdrive wires to the gear knob switch split during insulation. John shrink-wrapped these to protect them before fitting the gear leaver. The engine and gearbox oils were filled and the car was tested on the ramp before final fit-up took place. John found that overdrive now worked fine in 4th gear so the reassembly of this classic E-Type could continue.

John went on to refit the front hubs. He also bled the brakes before refitting and tightening the wheels. The radiator was also put back in the car.

The owner of our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 requested that the steering column bearings were replaced so John made sure this was done. He stripped and removed the column and, as he was doing so, John noticed that it had had its bearings looked at before. The bearings were replaced and the column was spaced out with a large washer. John then refitted the steering column.

Once the steering column was refitted and aligned, John made sure that the old bearings were kept secure for the owner of the car to see. He ran the car up to temperature and the fans cut in as they should.

Our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 is now ready for its engine installation to be finished this week as John continues his work on this beautiful classic car.

A Special Project

A very special project has recently arrived at Bridge Classic Cars in the form of our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5

The former owners of the vehicle were restoring it but, unfortunately, the project had stalled. Now it is with us though, we will be starting work to finish the restoration and bring this beautiful classic Jaguar back to its former glory.

We will be completing paint remedial work, reassembling the vehicle including rebuilding the engine and gearbox, as well as fitting a new interior.

Rebuilding an E-Type is special enough, but what makes this project extra special is that once complete, the plan is for our 1968 Jaguar E-Type Series 1.5 to be a competition car through Bridge Classic Cars Competitions.

There is obviously a lot of work to do before that can happen but, if winning an E-Type is something you would love, it will be well worth the wait.

Inspecting Our E-Type

Our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 has returned to the Bridge Classic Cars workshop to investigate and resolve some issues that the owner has been experiencing while driving the car.

Classic car technician Jonn started his investigative work by taking the car out for a road test. During his time in the car, he checked the overdrive operation and found that the solenoid powered and was working so it was suspected that the issue lies with the overdrive unit.

The speedo cable was also checked to see what might be causing it to jump during driving.

The handbrake warning light has been reported to come on during driving. Jonn found that the brake fluid reservoir was loose on the nearside which could be the reason for the light engaging.

When the car was up on the ramp, Jonn noted that there were a few oil leaks too.

To fix an issue with the clutch, the engine and gearbox need to be removed from our E-Type. Jonn began the process of removing these so he could fix the issue.

The bonnet hinges had seized so, to allow Jonn access, he heated the pins to aid the removal.

During the engine removal process, it was found that the top hose of the radiator was damaged. The front suspension was stripped to take the tension off the torsion bars.

The engine and gearbox removal then moved on to the interior centre console being stripped so Jonn could remove the gear lever and wiring. Classic car technician Rob then assisted Jon in removing the engine and gearbox.

The wheels were put back on the car so it can be moved to our secure storage facility until the engine and gearbox are ready to be put back in the car.

Jonn noted that there was lots of waxoyl covering many of the components making the job quite a messy one!

Once out of the car, the engine and gearbox were separated. The overdrive was removed and cleaned ready to be sent for repair.

The new clutch was aligned and fitted. Jonn removed the seized clevis pin in the clutch fork slave rod. He cleaned and replaced this with the new thrust bearing.

Our 1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 has turned into a big job that has required lots of time, skill, and experience. Luckily, Jonn (and the rest of the workshop team) have this in great quantities and the car is making good progress towards getting back to its owner and out on the road once more.