classic triumph

TR7 Service

Technician Juliam has been servicing our 1981 Triumph TR7. He changed the oil and filter, checked all levels, replaced the nearside front wheel bearing, removed

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More Progress

Our 1976 Triumph Spitfire has continued to make progress through the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. Rob has fitted the vinyl trim around the screen frame

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2 New Arrivals

We have recently welcomed two new arrivals into our secure hangar at Bentwaters Parks, a 1968 Triumph Spitfire and a 1963 Triumph TR4. These classics

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TR3 Appraisal

A 1957 Triumph TR3 recently arrived at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. It wasn’t with us for long but, during its short stay, the workshop

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A Stripey Stag

Classic car technician Alan has had our 1972 Triumph Stag in the Bridge Classic Cars Paintshop where he has completed a couple of jobs to

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A New Arrival

Our 1973 Triumph Spitfire has recently arrived at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. It will now be assessed by the workshop team before eventually becoming

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Ready To Go

Our 1981 Triumph TR7 V8 has, once again, been in the care of classic car technician John. He has been fitting a new core plug

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A TR7 Returns

We have recently welcomed our 1981 Triumph TR7 back into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. We have worked on this beautiful classic car before so

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Restoring A Spitfire

Another classic car will soon be arriving at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. Our 1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 is coming to us for a full

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Carb Jets

Our 1980 Triumph TR7 has been in classic car technician Rob’s experienced hands recently. Rob removed and stripped the carbs in order to replace the

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An Engine Rebuilt

We have recently welcomed our 1980 Triumph TR7 Convertible into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. Since being with us, the engine has been rebuilt and

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1958 Triumph TR3 – a wonderful life after Bridge

Earlier in the month I received a lovely email from Chris.

“I have just seen your blog posts regarding the red TR3A you gave away in 2021…. well, after you guys took her to the Silverstone auctions at the NEC, she ended up in Aberdeen, where the buyer never ended up using the car. Step in us, who purchased it last August in memory of my father who passed away earlier that year. It’s truly fantastic, and I have more pics of her recent adventures in the highlands.”

Chris bought the car in August 2023, he has spent his time so far renewing some cosmetic fittings.

“A new rear light lens and chrome, LED lighting, chrome lamp surrounds, a new windscreen, period registration plates, new battery and fittings, Ethanol proof rubber fuel lines, and even some new hub caps and enamelled badges for “Tilly’s” 65th birthday in December. A learning curve for sure!”

Thank you so much for sharing your story Chris and it’s wonderful to see the car being enjoyed. Keep sending through pictures of your adventures, we’d love to see them!

TR7 Service

Technician Juliam has been servicing our 1981 Triumph TR7. He changed the oil and filter, checked all levels, replaced the nearside front wheel bearing, removed the brake pads to clean and grease them, and resealed the top radiator hose.

More Progress

Our 1976 Triumph Spitfire has continued to make progress through the Bridge Classic Cars workshop.

Rob has fitted the vinyl trim around the screen frame and fitted the windscreen and top capping. He then fitted the lower steering column and the RH door.

While Rob was doing that, Alan was prepping, sealing and raptoring the bonnet, wheel arches, and lower bonnet panels ready for colour.

Spitfire Seam Seal and DTM

Alan has applied a DTM gloss black to some of the suspension parts. DTM or Direct To Metal paints are created to provide your metal substrate with protection from corrosion, yet provide a good cosmetic finish at the same time.


The internal joints have also been seam sealed and are now ready for colour.

2 New Arrivals

We have recently welcomed two new arrivals into our secure hangar at Bentwaters Parks, a 1968 Triumph Spitfire and a 1963 Triumph TR4.

These classics will be with us for a while until the Spitfire is ready to be recommissioned and the TR4 is potentially going to be restored in the future too.

In the meantime though, they are safe and secure surrounded by other beautiful classics.

Fixing Spitfire Corrosion

Classic car technician Rob has continued his work on the restoration of our 1976 Triumph Spitfire. He has been repairing corrosion in various parts of the vehicle.

After focussing on the rear seat pan area, Rob strengthened the bulkhead in the spots where Spitfires have a habit of cracking. He did this by welding in strengthening plates before trial fitting the rear wings.

The corrosion around the boot aperture was cut out and replaced, and the American spec side marker lamp apertures in the bonnet were filled in.

Rob also welded the right-hand side rear wing onto the car.

TR3 Appraisal

A 1957 Triumph TR3 recently arrived at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop.

It wasn’t with us for long but, during its short stay, the workshop team put the beautiful classic through a thorough appraisal to investigate an oil leak that its owner had noticed.

Classic car technician James conducted the appraisal and said that the overall condition of the car was generally good. It has recently had 4 new tyres and the discs are 12.7mm thick and brake pads 7.5mm. Underneath there were some areas where moisture was getting under the underseal, ideally, this needs cleaning back and retreating. Two areas had some more serious corrosion, the rear valance at the nearside, and a small area to the back of the offside wheel arch/boot floor is corroded and coming away. The oil leak from the engine appears to be high up, probably from the push rod tubes, but the front of the oil sump also looks to be weeping.

On further inspection, there is a leak of transmission fluid from the gearbox area centrally. Underneath the exhaust is fouling the gearbox mount bolt slightly, and on inspecting the rear drums, the shoes appear to be contaminated. On the top side of the car, it would appear the fuel tank cap seal has deteriorated, the central boot lock will not secure, and the ignition switch is a little temperamental. Finally, on checking the car over after being dropped off, the nearside front wheel centre nut was loose. This has been tightened but needs to be kept an eye on so that it does not loosen again.

The TR3 has gone home with its owner for now but we are looking forward to hopefully seeing it back in the workshop soon.

Stripping Down A Spitfire

Classic car technician Rob has been continuing his work on our 1976 Triumph Spitfire. He has been stripping down the chassis ready for it to be sandblasted.

The underseal was scraped off the underbody to ensure the best results possible are achieved during sandblasting. The doors of our Spitfire were also stripped down and the US spec side impact bars were removed and the doors were returned to European spec.

Finally, the rear wings were removed before the car left the workshop heading to the sandblasters.

Handmaking Classic Parts

When restoring classic cars, it can be difficult to get the exact part that you’re looking for.

This is exactly what happened when classic car technician Monty was looking to replace the door latch on our 1973 Triumph Spitfire. After ordering the part we needed (which was extremely difficult to find), it was found to be too small.

As another wasn’t available, Monty had to handmake a replacement.

In the photos below, you can see the original latch at the top, the purchased latch which was too small in the middle, followed by the one Monty made at the bottom.

This goes to show the level of skill that our technicians have in order to restore and repair the classic cars we work on.

TR6 Hood Frame Improvements

Our 1973 Triumph TR6 has been in the Bridge Classic Cars Paintshop with classic car technician Alan who has been painting the hood frame.

This is already an attention-grabbing car thanks to its yellow colour and improvements like this go a long way in making it even more admirable.

A Stripey Stag

Classic car technician Alan has had our 1972 Triumph Stag in the Bridge Classic Cars Paintshop where he has completed a couple of jobs to get the vehicle ready to go live on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions.

After making some repairs to the driver’s side door, Alan went on to add the black stripe down the side of our Stag finishing it off beautifully.

It now won’t be too much longer until someone will be lucky enough to win this classic Stag for themselves.

A New Arrival

Our 1973 Triumph Spitfire has recently arrived at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. It will now be assessed by the workshop team before eventually becoming a competition car on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions.

During our travels around the country picking up and delivering classic vehicles, we visited Paul Williamson Cars up in Scotland who had the Spitfire in the showroom.

We have had several Spitfires in the workshop over the years and this one looks to be a great example.

Saying Hello To Our TR6 Again

We have recently welcomed an old friend back into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop in the form of our 1973 Triumph TR6.

It has come to us for a full service and some paintwork. While it is with us, our team of technicians will also be fitting new bushes and adjustable trailing arms.

We are pleased to see one of our former projects return to us, and our yellow TR6 certainly stands out in the workshop.

Ready To Go

Our 1981 Triumph TR7 V8 has, once again, been in the care of classic car technician John. He has been fitting a new core plug and he also put coolant back into the car.

After passing its MOT, our TR7 is now ready to leave the Bridge Classic Cars workshop and be returned to its owner very soon.

A TR7 Returns

We have recently welcomed our 1981 Triumph TR7 back into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. We have worked on this beautiful classic car before so it’s nice to see it again. This time, it is in for a service and to have a new radiator fitted.

Classic car technician John installed the new radiator and boxed up the old one so that it can be returned to the customer. He then went on to vacuum-fill the system with new anti-freeze.

John continued to investigate the current condition of our TR7 and found a small coolant leak which he traced back to a corroded core plug. This was removed and a new one has been ordered.

Waiting For Its New Owner

Our 1974 Triumph Stag has been successfully delivered to the NEC in Birmingham ready for the Practical Classics Classic Car & Restoration Show Sale this weekend (25th and 26th March).

Classic Car Auctions will be hosting the auction and there are plenty of incredible vehicles available alongside our stunning Stag.

If you are interested in becoming the new owner of a 1974 Triumph Stag, then full details about it and the auction can be seen here.

Classic Car Auctions describe the car as “a handsome Sapphire Blue ‘Late Mk II’ Triumph Stag that has led a sheltered life for the last ten years” and “an attractively presented example of Triumph’s innovative design.”

We are looking forward to seeing our 1974 Triumph Stag go to a new home where it can be enjoyed by a new owner.

Restoring A Spitfire

Another classic car will soon be arriving at the Bridge Classic Cars workshop. Our 1976 Triumph Spitfire 1500 is coming to us for a full restoration.

This will be the 4th concours restoration for one of our customers. We will be working closely with them over the coming weeks and months to determine the final specifications of the registration. However, one thing that has already been confirmed is that it will stay as a left-hand drive vehicle. As it will be heading off to France once it leaves us, the current configuration is ideal.

We are looking forward to work beginning on our 1976 Triumph Spitfire very soon and we are sure it will look incredible once the restoration is complete.

Carb Jets

Our 1980 Triumph TR7 has been in classic car technician Rob’s experienced hands recently. Rob removed and stripped the carbs in order to replace the waxstat jets with the earlier style fixed jets.

Once he had done this, Rob set up the carbs and road-tested the vehicle. While driving the car, it was noted that the previous issue of an erratic tick-over had been resolved so the road test was a successful one.

Cleaning The Soft Top Cover

Classic car technician Brian has been cleaning the soft top cover of our 1980 Triumph TR7 Convertible.

After removing the cover from the car and cleaning it, it was noted that the sides had shrunk so required new material to be added to make it fit correctly.

Brian made patterns for the new side pieces before cutting them out. He then cut off the old side pieces so that the new pieces could be sewn in.

The soft top cover of our 1980 Triumph TR7 Convertible looks much better after its clean and finishes off this classic car nicely.

An Engine Rebuilt

We have recently welcomed our 1980 Triumph TR7 Convertible into the Bridge Classic Cars workshop.

Since being with us, the engine has been rebuilt and the vehicle has been prepared for an MOT. An issue with the coolant light will also be resolved before our TR7 is given a full valet.

We are sure the owner will be very pleased to have this sporty classic car returned to them very soon.

Entry Is Now Open – 1973 Triumph TR6

Our 1973 Triumph TR6 has gone through its Bridge Classic Cars workshop inspection and the team are happy for it to go live on Bridge Classic Cars Competitions.

Entry is now open and you can get your tickets to be in with a chance of winning this beautiful classic car for just £15.

You can find out all the information you need and get your tickets here.

A Stag Enters The Workshop

Our 1974 Triumph Stag recently arrived at the Bridge Classic Cars Workshop.

As you can see from the images below, it needs a good clean and will obviously undergo a thorough inspection and assessment with the workshop team.

Once our classic car technicians have given it the all clear, we will be able to put a plan of action together for its future.

Another New Arrival – 1973 Triumph TR6

We have recently welcomed yet another classic car to the Bridge Classic Cars workshop in the form of our 1973 Triumph TR6.

As with all cars that come to us, our team of classic car technicians will give it a thorough inspection and assessment before making a plan of action for its future.

This will ultimately be a competition car through Bridge Classic Cars Competitions but, before that, we will certainly enjoy having it with us until a new owner is found in the very near future.

Work Continues – 1977 Triumph Spitfire

Classic car technician Jon has once again been investigating the running issues facing our 1977 Triumph Spitfire. After his initial investigations and subsequent work with the brake fluid being used in the car, he has had to continue his work to find the cause of the running issues being experienced.

Jon stripped the carbs so he could thoroughly inspect them. He found dirt in both float bowls so these were blown out before Jon cleaned them out ready for reassembly.

The fuel lines were also blown out and the filter was removed and cleaned too. Jon found a small leak at the gearbox end of the fuel line so he fitted new seals to rectify the issue.

After this was all done, Jon balanced the carbs and rechecked and adjusted the ignition timing. Although Jon was keen to take our 1977 Triumph Spitfire out for a test drive to ensure everything was moving in the right direction, unfortunately, the weather was not suitable on his first attempt.

During his investigations, Jon bypassed the ballast resistor in the wiring loom by running the power wire directly to the coil. Doing this got the car running perfectly. Jon found an ignition-fed live wire which he traced back to the rear of the fuse box where he soldered the wire from fuse number 1 to the coil-positive terminal.

Jon tested everything and all was working as expected. The last thing to do was to tidy up the wiring and to refit the components.

Now that Jon has been spending some time with our Spitfire, it looks to be making good progress and will soon be back with its owner and on the road again.

Triumph Spitfire Brake Fluid

Classic car technician Jon has continued his investigations into the running issues that our 1977 Triumph Spitfire has been experiencing.

He bled the brakes of the car and noticed that two different types of brake fluid had been used.

Triumph Spitfire brake fluid is usually DOT5. However, when bleeding the brakes, both DOT5 and DOT4 were found.

DOT4 and DOT5 Brake Fluid

In very simple terms, brake fluid is responsible for moving the pressure from the brake lever to the brake pads. Brake fluid should lubricate the callipers, help prevent corrosion, and have a high boiling point. There are 4 different types of Brake fluid – DOT3, DOT4, DOT5, and DOT5.1

Each type of brake fluid has a different boiling point. If brake fluid boils, it forms air bubbles which increases how much it can be compressed resulting in poorer performance of your braking system.

DOT3 and DOT4 are the most common types of brake fluids used.

DOT4 brake fluid is glycol ether-based. It has a higher boiling point which is more stable than that of DOT3 brake fluid.

DOT5 is a silicon-based brake fluid and can withstand higher temperatures than DOT3 and DOT4.

As a general rule, it is usually a good idea to change the brake fluid in your car every two years. Obviously, this will depend on the amount of mileage you do but two years is a good timeframe to keep in mind. Brake fluid absorbs water over time so the longer you leave it between changes, the poorer your braking system will operate.

It’s worth noting that DOT3 and DOT4 brake fluid shouldn’t be mixed with DOT5. Doing so could result in brake failure. DOT5 is a silicone-based brake fluid so is not compatible with the glycol-based DOT3 and DOT4 fluids.

Our 1977 Triumph Spitfire Brake Fluid

When Jon bled the brakes of our Triumph Spitfire, it was clear that both DOT4 and DOT5 had been used. In the photo below, you can see that the DOT5 brake fluid has risen to the top while the DOT4 fluid fell to the bottom of the container.

Now the brake fluid issue has been resolved, investigations continue into this classic car’s running issues.

Investigating Running Issues

Our 1977 Triumph Spitfire came into the workshop for the team to investigate some running issues it was experiencing. Classic car technician Jon has begun looking into these issues and already found and rectified some of them.

The first thing Jon did was to charge the flat battery. He then removed and regapped the spark plugs. While doing this he found that the gap on 2 of the spark plugs was closed completely which could be a cause of some of the running issues.

Jon went on to remove and check the carb too.

The video below shows Jon making sure the static timing is aligned and that the rotary arm is pointing to cylinder 1 as it should. The video also shows the advance moving in the distributor when the vacuum is applied.

New on MyClassics.co.uk – 1973 Triumph Stag

If you’ve ever thought about owning a 1973 Triumph Stag, then now is the time to head over to MyClassics.co.uk as one has recently been listed for sale.

The car has been with its current owner since 2010 and is a past concours winner. Photos and details of the restoration work that has been undertaken by former owners are available, so this certainly sounds like a well-cared-for classic car.

The current owner feels that the Stag is not used enough so, hopefully, a new owner can be found who will be able to enjoy many miles in this beautiful car and get it back out onto the road where it belongs.

Out & About – 1973 Triumph TR6 in France

The 1973 Triumph TR6, which was restored in-house at the Bridge Classic Cars Suffolk HQ, has been out on its travels recently!

The car has been used on holiday in France by its owner and looks like the perfect companion for a countryside jaunt.

We love seeing our cars out there in the world being used and enjoyed!

Heating Up – Fixing the Heater on the 1968 Triumph TR5

The technicians in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop have been working on getting the heater system working properly on the 1968 Triumph TR5.

Jon found the cable which controls the heater wasn’t working but also that the heater flaps had almost seized in the dashboard. Jon freed up the flaps and found the heater box had distorted slightly not allowing the direction flap to move freely but after some adjustments all was ok and then could work on replacing the heater cable into the dash.

Wiring Repairs – Fixing Some Wiring Issues with the 1968 Triumph TR5

The next step on the 1968 Triumph TR5 in the Bridge Classic Cars workshop was to resolve a few wiring issues.

Our technician Dave went through several of the systems and found a continuity issue with some of the wiring around the gearbox. The team traced it to a broken connector which was replaced and tested.