Goodwood Revival 2017

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]A welcome return for 2017 with the romance and glamour of motor racing as it used to be. The Revival is the only historic race meeting to be staged entirely in period dress and is a return to the halcyon days of Goodwood as the spiritual home of British motor racing.

It’s an unabashed celebration of flat-out wheel-to-wheel racing, around the sweeps and curves of this classic circuit, which remains unchanged since its heyday. The inaugural Revival opened on 18 September 1998, when the Earl of March drove around the circuit in the Bristol 400 in which his grandfather, the 9th Duke of Richmond, opened the track 50 years before. It’s now the world’s most celebrated historic motor racing event, with race fans coming from all over the country to soak up the unique atmosphere in period costume.

The History of Goodwood

In the autumn of 1998 motor racing returned to Goodwood for the first time since the closure of the famous Motor Circuit in 1966. Known as the Goodwood Revival, the event has since become one of the biggest historic motorsport events in the world and the only one to be staged entirely in period dress.

All the stars

From 1948 to 1966 the Goodwood circuit was the spiritual home of British motor racing, staging classic races such as the Tourist Trophy for sports cars and the Glover Trophy for Grand Prix cars. All the top drivers of the day came to Goodwood on Easter Monday, from Juan Manuel Fangio and Stirling Moss in the 1950s to Jim Clark and Graham Hill through the 1960s. The circuit was established by Freddie March (later 9th Duke of Richmond), himself a Brooklands winner, and was revived by his grandson Charles, Earl of March, in 1998. The Revival event is a magical step back in time to the romance and glamour of motor racing as it used to be in Goodwood’s heyday.

Tweeds and frocks

The Revival is staged at the Goodwood Motor Circuit, its mid-September date now firmly established in the international motorsport calendar. The event is defined by its period dress code: tweeds and trilbies for men, furs and frocks for the ladies, and by its refusal to allow modern cars within the circuit on race days. It is also famed for its war bird flying displays in recognition of Goodwood’s history as a wartime fighter base.

This year we were unable to attended ourselves due to other work commitments but of course, our good friend Tony from Wyatt Polishing was there to see all the action…so I’ve pinched his photos!!

 

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